API of the month – apility

A friend of mine pitched the idea to start a blog series titled „API of the month“ based on my GitHub repository https://github.com/deralexxx/security-apis.

The idea of that series is to cover an API each month, provide some samples, talk about potential target audience and use cases for the API.

Service description

The first API to be covered is apility. The service is marketed as „Minimal and Simple Anti-Abuse API for Everyone.“ and the web page starts with a Google-like search mask.

apility screenshot

API documentation

The API documentation is pretty comprehensive and available via web page: https://apility.io/apidocs/. The documentation also gives nice curl examples for every API endpoint that can be copy-pasted.

apility APi documentation

API pricing

The API itself is free but is limited in regards to API calls that can be done. pricing options are available on https://apility.io/pricing/

Example

As an example I tried to get ratings for IPs / domains for a recent APT OSINT report.

To get started you need to sign up and verify your account via an email that you receive shortly after signing up.

I took the tweet from the malwrhunterteam: https://twitter.com/malwrhunterteam/status/1126894905668849664 to test my scripts and also the famous trafficconverter(.)biz

Especially the trafficconverter domain was listed by the tool:

{„response“: {„domain“: {„blacklist“: [„ISC-DOMAINS-LOW“, „ISC-DOMAINS-MEDIUM“], „blacklist_mx“: [], „blacklist_ns“: [], „mx“: [], „ns“: [], „score“: -1}, „ip“: {„address“: „38.102.150.28“, „blacklist“: [], „is_quarantined“: false, „score“: 0}, „source_ip“: {„address“: „“, „blacklist“: [], „is_quarantined“: false, „score“: 0}, „score“: -1}, „type“: „baddomain“}

The scripts I used are available on github:

import requests
from configparser import ConfigParser

config = ConfigParser()
config.read("config.cfg")
APIKEy = config.get('API', 'APIKEY')
print(APIKEy)

url = "https://api.apility.net/baddomain/"

headers = {
'accept': "application/json",
'x-auth-token': APIKEy
}

f = open('./input.txt', 'r')
for line in f.readlines():
print("Will investigate "+line)
response = requests.request("GET", url+line, headers=headers, verify=False)

print(response.text)

print("finished")

It should be noted that there is also a python package available at https://github.com/Apilityio/python-cli and can be installed (but I have not tested it) via:

pip install apilityio-cli

or

easy_install apilityio-cli

Target audience

The target audience for the API as well as the service is:

  • sysadmins who want to use the offered data to sharpen perimeter security tools
  • Researchers to add more data points to their research
  • Threat Intelligence professionals as a data source
  • Incident responders to monitor if any of the ASN / domains they are responsible for is added to one of the blacklists

Bitcoin transaction in timelines

Investigation bad people might involve bitcoin, the blockchain technology is very popular among criminals, as it is easy to use and „untraceable“ [1]. E.g. in most ransomware cases like „Ryuk“ [2] the company Crowdstrike has listed several bitcoin wallets, that they attribute to the threat actor.

How can that information help your investigation / your intelligence gathering? IN certain ways, you could track your own wallets for transactions to these wallets. Another aspect, that this blogpost will cover on is the timeline aspect of it.

As bitcoin transactions make use of the blockchain, who is public by design, it is possible to:

  • tell, how many bitcoins a certain wallet currently holds
  • see transactions from the past

The second aspect is what I want to focus on, because if we have a look at the transactions, we might be able to identify the point in time a certain group was active and enhance our other DFIR activities enriched with that information. The transaction log is like your journal of your bank account, it tells basically who is transferring money to a wallet and where the bitcoins are transferred to.

In the example above, the bitcoin wallets we are interested in are (Source Crowdstrike Blog post):

BTC AddressTotal ReceivedNo ReceivedTotal Value (USD)
12vsQry1XrPjPCaH8gWzDJeYT7dhTmpcjL55.003$221,685.46
1Kx9TT76PHwk8sw7Ur6PsMWyEtaogX7wWY182.9910$734,601.91
1FtQnqvjxEK5GJD9PthHM4MtdmkAeTeoRt48.2504$188,974.93
14aJo5L9PTZhv8XX6qRPncbTXecb8Qohqb25.002$113,342.70
1E4fQqzCvS8wgqy5T7n1DW8JMNMaUbeFAS0.0011$6.47
1GXgngwDMSJZ1Vahmf6iexKVePPXsxGS6H30.003$132,654.91
1Cyh35KqhhDewmXy63yp9ZMqBnAWe4oJRr0.000$0.00
15LsUgfnuGc1PsHJPcfLQJEnHm2FnGAgYC0.000$0.00
1CbP3cgi1Bcjuz6g2Fwvk4tVhqohqAVpDQ13.002$82,917.49
1Jq3WwsaPA7LXwRNYsfySsd8aojdmkFnW35.001$221,979.83
129L4gRSYgVJTRCgbPDtvYPabnk2QnY9sq0.000$0.00
1ET85GTps8eFbgF1MvVhFVZQeNp2a6LeGw3.3251$12,661.74
1FRNVupsCyTjUvF36GxHZrvLaPtY6hgkTm38.993$246,893.95
1CW4kTqeoedinSmZiPYH7kvn4qP3mDJQVa24.0772$152,727.13
13rTF3AYsf8xEdafUMT5W1E5Ab2aqPhkPi0.000$0.00
17zTcgKhF8XkWvkD4Y1N8634Qw37KwYkZT0.000$0.00
14dpmsn9rmdcS4dKD4GeqY2dYY6pwu4nVV0.000$0.00
17v2cu8RDXhAxufQ1YKiauBq6GGAZzfnFw0.000$0.00
1KUbXkjDZL6HC3Er34HwJiQUAE9H81Wcsr10.001$63,358.27
12UbZzhJrdDvdyv9NdCox1Zj1FAQ5onwx30.000$0.00
1NMgARKzfaDExDSEsNijeT3QWbvTF7FXxS0.000$0.00
19AE1YN6Jo8ognKdJQ3xeQQL1mSZyX16op25.001$164,774.21
1L9fYHJJxeLMD2yyhh1cMFU2EWF5ihgAmJ40.0354$259,478.16
18eu6KrFgzv8yTMVvKJkRM3YBAyHLonk5G30.001$198,651.35
1C8n86EEttnDjNKM9Tjm7QNVgwGBncQhDs30.00822$194,113.76
12N7W9ycLhuck9Q2wT8E6BaN6XzZ4DMLau0.000$0.00
162DVnddxsbXeVgdCy66RxEPADPETBGVBR0.000$0.00
1ChnbV4Rt7nsb5acw5YfYyvBFDj1RXcVQu28.002$175,177.98
1K6MBjz79QqfLBN7XBnwxCJb8DYUmmDWAt1.72$12,455.95
1EoyVz2tbGXWL1sLZuCnSX72eR7Ju6qohH0.000$0.00
1NQ42zc51stA4WAVkUK8uqFAjo1DbWv4Kz0.000$0.00
15FC73BdkpDMUWmxo7e7gtLRtM8gQgXyb40.000$0.00
14hVKm7Ft2rxDBFTNkkRC3kGstMGp2A4hk10.002$64,990.62
1CN2iQbBikFK9jM34Nb3WLx5DCenQLnbXp15.001$92,934.80
1LKULheYnNtJXgQNWMo24MeLrBBCouECH70.000$0.00
15RLWdVnY5n1n7mTvU1zjg67wt86dhYqNj50.413$326,477.83
1KURvApbe1yC7qYxkkkvtdZ7hrNjdp18sQ0.000$0.00
1NuMXQMUxCngJ7MNQ276KdaXQgGjpjFPhK101$41,034.54

Source of transaction information

There is a whole bunch of public webpages who give transaction history for a given wallet, but as it should be an automated step, the goal is to have a page with an API, after some searching I found: https://chain.so/api .

Making the call

Doing the API call to get transaction information is pretty simple:

GET /api/v2/address/{NETWORK}/{ADDRESS} 

That will give you the following information

{
  "status": "success",
  "data": {
    "network": "DOGE",
    "address": "DM7Yo7YqPtgMsGgphX9RAZFXFhu6Kd6JTT",
    "balance": "31.03885339",
    "received_value": "25828731.93733507",
    "pending_value": "0.0",
    "total_txs": 225,
    "txs": [ ... ]
}

Which is exactly what we need, with some Python JSON parsing, it is easy to get the info we want – the code I am using is available on https://github.com/deralexxx/osint_to_timesketch

After that we have an CSV with the date, the transaction happened, the raw information from the API and some meta data, enough to bake into a timeline.

Automation

The script is already made to output CSV files ready for importing them into Timesketch, as I found it to be the ideal tool to work with data points related to timestamps. Importing the CSV is straight forward and explained in the official documentation page [3].

The timeline csv looks like the following:

CSV of BTC history

Making it pretty

Importing it into Timesketch, the timeline looks very nice:

BTC transactions in Timesketch

Added Value

Now what is the added value for investigations? The above is another layer of data points /evidence. It can be used to weight limit findings in your organisation, e.g. you assume you are hit by a phishing campaign, if your phishing campaign was seen a lot earlier or a lot later than the transactions above display, it is unlikely you are hit by the same campaign. It can also be used to make a case against individuals if enriched by host forensics – your imagination is the limit.

End

I hope the article is helpful and the scripts can be used, let me know via comments within the blog, issues on github or twitter messages https://twitter.com/alexanderjaeger if you have any questions, improvements.

Thx for reading

Further reading / references

  • [1] http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/03/why-criminals-cant-hide-behind-bitcoin
  • [2] https://www.crowdstrike.com/blog/big-game-hunting-with-ryuk-another-lucrative-targeted-ransomware/
  • [3] https://github.com/google/timesketch/blob/master/docs/CreateTimelineFromJSONorCSV.md

Komand-tools

Out of my attempt to reverse engineer the Komand API (a security orchestration tool) I found myself writing some python helper to use the API. Maybe it is useful for some people, so I decided to OpenSource it.

It is hard to understand why a tool, thats main purpose it to connect APIs does not have an API documentation / client itself.

Usage should be pretty simple, clone the repository and good to go:


usage: komand-tools.py [-h] [-v] [-wm] [-j JOB]

optional arguments:
-h, --help show this help message and exit
-v, --verbose increase output verbosity
-wm, --workflow_map show workflow map
-j JOB, --job JOB show job status

Feel free to open Issues or Make Pull Requests. The repository is hosted on Github: https://github.com/deralexxx/komand-tools/

Security API collection

While working on different stuff I was searching for a collection of APIs that are related of useful for security researchers, incident response people or threat intel.

Unable to find a good list of REST APIs decided to start it. The collection is hosted on a Security API list, and pull requests or issues mentioning missing APIs are highly welcome.

Why did I produce such a list? More and more people want to automate their workflows, Security Orchestration is the new Buzzword after last years Threat Intelligence, but basically containing the same, they both have in common to facilitate already available data, with Orchestration not storing that much data but enriching dots collected.

However the challenge is, what to integrate, everyone has their „go to“ tools they use on a daily base risking to miss some golden nuggets that are handy.

The list is divided (at the moment) in tools that are mostly on prem., online tools, SIEMs and various. With an increasing number of APIs that ordering might change of course.

So I really hope the list is useful and people can use it and that it can grow.